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iPhone 6 Review: The Most Appealing iPhone Ever


Apple finally gave the iPhone a much-needed rethink, and the result is a product that is more like its competition than ever before, but also stands out just as well, if not better, in a seriously overcrowded market. The big talking point is its screen size - months of leaks told us nearly everything we needed to know long before the actual launch happened - but there's also plenty more to explore. As always, Apple has managed to deliver more power, better aesthetics, improved cameras, and all-new software.
The iPhone 6 shares a lot with its larger sibling, the iPhone 6 Plus (Review | Photos), which we reviewed a little while ago. They're obviously designed to look similar, butApple has also made sure they're very similar to use. The iPhone 6 is still just as much of a premium device as ever; not a lower-end version of a new flagship. A lot of what we've said in that exhaustive review of the 6 Plus will apply to the iPhone 6 as well.
Apple's unique position lets it control and tightly integrate the hardware and software experiences of its products. We see all of this and more in this year's new iPhones.
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Look and feel
Gone are the flat edges and sharp angles of the iPhone 5s. The iPhone 6 feels smooth and slick, with a lovely dark glass front that looks like a pool of ink. The glass is raised above its rim and is curved at the edges so that it meets the metal in a smooth curve. It seems as though the glass could shatter very easily if this phone is dropped and lands on a corner, which is just one of many reasons to invest in a case of some sort.
Another good reason is that the rear of the iPhone 6 is one of the least attractive designs we've ever seen coming out of Apple. The plastic antenna lines intersecting the metal body are just too prominent. There's a bunch of regulatory text and logos which we wish could have been less prominent, and then of course there's the infamous camera bulge. The little nubbin really does stick out prominently, and we couldn't help fidgeting with it when holding the iPhone 6 in our hands.
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The top is blank, because the power button has now been moved to the upper right side, just above the Nano-SIM card tray. This will be disconcerting for long-time iPhone users. The move was probably not necessary, given this phone's still-manageable size, but it keeps things consistent with the design of the iPhone 6 Plus. The ringer mute switch and volume buttons are on the left edge per usual, and the Lightning port and headset socket are on the bottom. We cannot overstate the quality of Apple's fabrication and machining processes; all the buttons have just the right feel, and even the charger's Lightning connector slips into its port with a satisfying thunk.
This is a very satisfying phone to hold and to use. We didn't think Apple needed to make its iPhones any slimmer, but we really like the iPhone 6 when we hold it in our hands. The weight and balance are also just right, so we're glad Apple finally embraced the idea of producing a bigger phone.
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Specifications
The iPhone 6 uses Apple's new A8 processor, designed in-house but based on the industry-standard ARM architecture. There's a separate co-processor called the M8 for sensor input, which helps save battery life by allowing the A8 to go to sleep while physical activity is constantly detected and processed in the background.
The screen is of course larger than those on the iPhone 5 generation models but still a lot smaller than the one on the iPhone 6 Plus. The resolution isn't a huge bump up from that of the iPhone 5 series, and the pixel density is exactly the same. We liked the crisp, bright display on the 6 Plus, and while the one on the iPhone 6 is just as good in terms of quality, it doesn't feel very exciting. Competitors have long surpassed Apple in terms of resolution, and the difference between some of the current Android flagships and the iPhone 6 is definitely noticeable, if ultimately unimportant.
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There's 1GB of RAM which seems stingy compared to Android devices today, though we didn't find this to be much of a problem on the iPhone 6 Plus when we reviewed it. The fact that storage is not expandable is a constant frustration for us - iPhones are already expensive and it just hurts to have to pay a ridiculous amount over and above the starting price just to have enough space to actually use these devices to their full potential.
The relatively new high-speed Wi-Fi ac standard is supported, as is Bluetooth 4.0. LTE is supported on the Indian 2300MHz band and NFC is new to this iPhone generation, but only works with Apple Pay which isn't available outside the USA yet.
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Software
A large part of the iPhone 6's appeal lies in iOS - more specifically, iOS 8. Not all features work as well on older iPhones, so software alone is not a strong enough reason to upgrade from a device that's less than three years old.
iOS 8 has lots of new features, big and small. Little things such as much-improved photo editing tools, Notification Centre widgets, tweaks in Safari and voice messages over iMessage all contribute to making the iPhone 6 a pleasure to use. App extensionsare usually subtle, but this feature represents one of the best new things about iOS, and developers will surely take better advantage of it over time. Custom keyboardswill be a game-changer for Apple, and some truly innovative apps have sprung up letting you do all kinds of things with messages. Improvements to mail handling and iTunes content management area also much appreciated.
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One of the most visible new iOS 8 features is the Health app. This is a little unintuitive to use - you can see an activity dashboard and entries for dozens of trackable metrics, but things only really take off when you download additional apps that use the Healthkit framework and populate all that information. The combination of Healthkit and the M8 coprocessor allow for some very detailed and impressive information gathering. There's still a lot that could be improved. It's very un-Apple to have so many things to track - things such as Molybdenum, Peripheral Perfusion Index and Selenium are not within the consciousness of the average user, but there are still ways to track all of them so it seems pointless to present them all right at the beginning.
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The Reachability shortcut, ie double-tapping the Home button to make the screen's contents slide down towards your fingers, is pretty handy but you have to develop a habit of using it or you might forget it's there. It's going to take a long time for apps to be updated with the correct screen resolution and scaling factor, but those that have been optimised look great.
iPhone owners who also use a Mac and/or an iPad might also want to try out the new Continuity features. Some have limited appeal, such as being able to make voice calls from a Mac through an iPhone, whereas the ability to begin composing an email on one device and then just continue from anywhere on another could really improve the way people work.
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Camera
The rear camera is still 8 megapixels, but the lens and sensor have been improved to allow for better low-light shots and colour accuracy. Videos can now be taken with continuous autofocus and improved stabilisation. 120fps slow-motion, which was introduced with the iPhone 5s now coexists with 240fps slow-motion, and there's a new time-lapse mode in iOS 8 that older phones can also use.
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Apple's camera app is mostly barebones - there are no fancy special effects or multi-page menus of options. The new capabilities of the iPhone 6 and iOS 8 are thus easy to discover, but it's beginning to feel as though Apple can't decide whether to offer more options or keep its interface minimalist.
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4K video recording is missing, and the iPhone 6 falls behind its competitors in this regard. Even if you don't plan on shooting all your videos at such a high resolution, it's nice to have the option to do so. The cap on storage space would also make it very difficult to store 4K videos.
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We were very happy with the iPhone 6's camera. Images taken during the day were crisp with accurate colours and superb levels of detail. Closeups were brilliant, and even distant objects were captured very well. Low-light performance was also admirable - the iPhone 6 works very well indoors as well as outdoors, even with minimal artificial or ambient lighting. We were constantly surprised by how well shots came out - there was noticeable noise but details were still well defined when seen at reduced size on a screen. Photos came out looking as though they had been taken in far better light.
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Performance
Once again, we're reminded that numbers and acronyms on a specifications sheet can't always be used to judge a device. The dual-core Apple A8 processor and its integrated graphics capabilities are more than capable of holding their own against quad- and octa-core products from leading competitors.
We had no problems with the iPhone 6, whether we were playing heavy games, recording high-speed video, multitasking, or just relaxing while browsing the Web. The phone is super-responsive, and unique features such as Apple's Touch ID sensor just make the whole experience of using an iPhone butter-smooth. There are of course things that aren't as flexible or functional as they are in Android, but overall, the iOS platform is a joy to use.
Benchmark scores were very, very good. Largely due to the fact that the powerful A8 processor doesn't have to push itself to drive a very high-res screen, we managed to achieve some superb scores in graphics-intensive benchmarks. GFXBench produced a record high of 50.1fps, while 3DMark Ice Storm was maxed out in the regular and Extreme modes, but posted a score of 17,302 in the Unlimited mode. HD videos also played without a hitch.
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AnTuTu for iOS gave us a phenomenal score of 49,319 points which is practically the same as the 49,353 points the iPhone 6 Plus managed. The test still detects a resolution of 640x1136 though, which explains the similar scores and means they aren't representative of either device at its native resolution.
Battery life was pretty good, but we were hoping for spectacular. Our video loop test ran for 7 hours, 40 minutes. This is a clear point in favour of the much larger iPhone 6 Plus. Call quality was superb, but we do with Apple could work on better speakers for its iPhones - the single mono speaker on the bottom isn't very loud or rich, and competitors do much better.
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Verdict
As we stated in our review of the iPhone 6 Plus, Apple's two new devices are very similar in terms of the experience they deliver, with only the screen size setting them apart. Thus, users can choose the screen size (and physical size) that suits them better, without feeling as though they've compromised by picking a lesser device either way. In the Android world, larger phones tend to hog all the best features, and "mini" versions are almost always cut down.
That said, the iPhone 6's relatively smaller body means that the battery is smaller, and the camera has to make do without optical image stabilisation. On the other hand, each iPhone 6 model comes in at Rs. 9,000 less expensive than the equivalent iPhone 6 Plus. We think most people would be better off with a 64GB iPhone 6 than a 16GB iPhone 6 Plus at the same price.
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Specifications shouldn't fool you into thinking this phone is any less powerful than an Android flagship. If you've been waiting for a reason to ditch an old phone and jump onto the Apple bandwagon, the iPhone 6 is one of the best reasons to do so. If you're thinking of upgrading from an iPhone 4S or earlier, you'll absolutely love what the iPhone 6 has to offer. Naturally, the difference won't be as stark for iPhone 5 or 5s owners running iOS 8, and they can easily stick with their current phones for another year or so unless they really feel like splurging.
If you aren't sure whether you want to choose Android or an iPhone, there are quite a few options to choose from. This generation's flagships, the Sony Xperia Z3 (Review |Photos) Samsung Galaxy S5 (Review | Photos) HTC One (M8) (Review | Photos) and LG G3 (Review | Photos) are all larger but most of them are quite a bit less expensive and also offer value in the form of features such as expandable storage and 4K video recording.
One final note: when reviewing new flagship phones, we usually consider whether their own predecessors offer good value, considering how prices tend to fall. Amazingly, the iPhone 5s (16GB) is still officially sold for Rs. 53,500 which is the same price as the iPhone 6! If you can find a 5s in retail for less than Rs. 40,000 today, it's still a great deal. An official 5s price cut is long overdue, at which point the 32GB model will be cheaper than the 16GB iPhone 6 - this will be a very tempting option indeed.

iPhone 6 in pictures
Apple iPhone 6

Apple iPhone 6

Rs. 53,449
  • Design
  • Display
  • Software
  • Performance
  • Battery life
  • Camera
  • Value for money
  • Good
  • Thin, light, easy to handle
  • Excellent camera
  • Superb performance
  • Reasonably good battery life



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This Car Runs For 100 Years Without Refuelling – The Thorium Car


If your car was powered by thorium, you would never need to refuel it. The vehicle would burn out long before the chemical did. The thorium would last so long, in fact, it would probably outlive you.


That’s why a company called Laser Power Systems has created a concept for a thorium-powered car engine. The element is radioactive, and the team uses bits of it to build a laserbeam that heats water, produces steam, and powers an energy-producing turbine.
Thorium is one of the most dense materials on the planet. A small sample of it packs 20 million times more energy than a similarly-sized sample of coal, making it an ideal energy source.
The thing is, Dr. Charles Stevens, the CEO of Laser Power Systems, told Mashable that thorium engines won’t be in cars anytime soon.
“Cars are not our primary interest,” Stevens said. ”The automakers don’t want to buy them.”
He said too much of the automobile industry is focused on making money off of gas engines, and it will take at least a couple decades for thorium technology to be used enough in other industries that vehicle manufacturers will begin to consider revamping the way they think about engines.
“We’re building this to power the rest of the world,” Stevens said. He believes a thorium turbine about the size of an air conditioning unit could more provide cheap power for whole restaurants, hotels, office buildings, even small towns in areas of the world without electricity. At some point, thorium could power individual homes.
Stevens understands that people may be wary of Thorium because it is radioactive — but any such worry would be unfounded.

 
 

Hi-tech home security ensures peace of mind


Technology has changed the home security business to the benefit of homeowners.
According to Patrice De Luca, vice-president of marketing and customer care for Reliance Protectron Security Services, the latest advancements in home security systems are leaving homeowners with a greater sense of peace of mind that their home is being protected while they’re away.
This is due to the latest interactive services giving clients protection that goes far beyond the role of a traditional home security system. Here are some of the interactive tools now available:
Video surveillance: You can set up video surveillance around your property and in your home that seamlessly sleeves into your existing system.
You can subscribe to interactive video surveillance to record activity at preset times or begin recording when motion is detected.
“Only you can monitor what’s happening in your house through your webcams, as our monitoring centres cannot access your cameras,” says De Luca.
You can, for example, make sure your kids arrived home safely from school.
Interactive door locks: If you have guests that will be house-sitting or getting your mail for you while you are away, there is no need to give them a key.
You can give them a passcode to unlock your door which you can change or delete immediately upon your return from vacation.
Interactive thermostat: You no longer have to worry if you left the furnace on or not before you leave the house. You can simply check the status of your thermostat through your computer or your smartphone and turn it off if you forgot.
As an added bonus, you can turn it on just before you get back home.
Remote control lighting and appliances: You can also control appliances and your lighting remotely using the same interactive technology, so you can make sure appliances are shut off and make it look like someone is home by switching lights on and off in the evening.
All this control is accessible by logging in to your myprotectron.com account from your personal computer, BlackBerry, Android, iPhone app or any web-enabled device.
Go to www.protectron.com for more information.
— News Canada

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How to Replace Your Galaxy S5 Screen

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The Samsung Galaxy S5 display can be replaced by most do-it-yourselfers with some basic mechanical skills and a few inexpensive tools. The good news is that once you replace your display assembly your screen will be good as new with no bubbles or dust on the inside. The replacement part is a bit pricey but that is a good percentage of the cost involved with manufacturing this device. Below is a video showing the entire process from start to finish. It's best to turn on your volume for the narration as well as watching the video all of the way through before you begin.


Remember that you will need to remove all of the screws from the back of the phone and unplug the home button flex cable as shown in the video. If you don't it will most likely be torn and that adds to the cost of your repair. You will need the following tools:
  • Small Phillips driver- PH00 or PH000
  • Heat gun- a blow dryer will not give you the required heat
  • Pry tools- Guitar picks from the music store are perfect
  • iSesamo opening tool- optional but very helpful
This is not for everyone so please be sure that you feel confident about proceeding before you attempt this repair. If you have any doubts you might want to find someone to help you or have the repair done by a professional. Otherwise here we go...
  1. Start by removing the battery and all of the screws in the back panel.
  1. Remove the plastic plate covering the home button pop connector and unplug it.
  1. Heat the front of the phone thoroughly and slowly pry the old display off just enough to disconnect the display flex cable. Gently pry the soft key cable away from the lens. If you pull the display out to far you will tear these and have to replace them.
  1. Remove any broken debris that might be stuck to the mid-frame adhesive. Add new adhesive if necessary.
  1. Reverse the disassembly steps in order to put the phone bad together.
  1. Get a heavy duty case for your S5- optional but highly recommended.
 

Ten of the newest, most high-tech features for your car

Ten new high-tech features for your car


When consumers go looking for new cars, they'll often say that they're looking for certain things. What kind of gas mileage does it get? What will it cost to maintain? What kind of safety features does it have? Again, that's what consumers will say they're looking for.
In reality, they're looking for a few other things too, things that can hold almost as much sway over the decision-making process as any practical concern. Namely, does it look cool? Would Daniel Craig be seen driving this? And does it come with new, high-tech gadgets worthy of a fictional British superspy?
Karl Brauer, a senior director at the car valuation and analysis company Kelley Blue Book, understands this, and he provided CNBC.com with a list of 10 new high-tech features for cars. They address every part of the driving experience, from road safety to avoiding traffic jams and much, much more.
What are some of the most exciting new high-tech gadgets for your car? Read CNBC.com's list to find out.
By Daniel BukszpanUpdated 31 Oct. 2013
Tune in to the new season of "The Car Chasers" on CNBC Prime, all new episodes Tuesdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Crash avoidance


No matter how good a car's rear crumple zone is, some collisions cause major damage no matter what. According to Brauer, this situation is being addressed by car manufacturers, who are shifting emphasis from crash protection to crash avoidance. After all, a semi coming at you at 95 mph can't do any damage if it never hits you.
"Technologies like Volvo's City Safety System and Infiniti's Forward Collision Warning will stop a vehicle even if the driver's foot doesn't go near the brake pedal," he said. "This technology reduces not only the injuries to vehicle occupants and pedestrians, but insurance costs for everyone."


Maximum efficiency


According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the cost of gasoline during the week of Oct. 28, 2013, is $3.30 a gallon. At that price, motorists want all the fuel efficiency they can get, and Brauer said that most car companies now offer a wide range of under-hood technologies to provide it.
"These features aren't restricted to hybrids or electric vehicles," he said. "The high performance Porsche Cayenne includes variable valve timing, cylinder deactivation and engine stop-start technology, that latter of which shuts the engine off when at a stop and automatically restarts it when the driver takes his foot off the brake."

Hi-fi audio


For many commuters, the radio is the one thing that makes sitting in eternal bumper-to-bumper traffic a bearable experience. But why listen to the Steve Miller Band and Bachman-Turner Overdrive through two small, tinny dashboard speakers when there are systems that can turn a car into a travelling arena rock event?
"An audio system like Land Rover's Meridian sound system, with 380 watts, 13 speakers, 12 channels and multiple digital signal processing modes can recreate the most lavish concert hall listening experience," Brauer said. "These systems use optimized speaker placement throughout a car's interior to create maximum acoustic imaging and aural punch, rivaling the most advanced home audio setups."

Lane keeping


When operating a motor vehicle, we're supposed to keep our eyes on the road, our hands on the wheel and our attention front and center. In real life, however, drivers don't always follow the rules, and even the most conscientious motorist can get distracted. It's at moments like those that automatic lane keeping comes in handy.
"Cars like the 2014 Mercedes-Benz S-Class and Infiniti Q50 can actually keep a vehicle within its assigned lane without any driver input," Brauer said. "While no manufacturer encourages 'hands-free' behavior, a combination of sensors and steering motors will keep many modern vehicles 'between the lines' on both straight and curving roadways."

Remote control


In 20th century science fiction accounts of the year 2000, everything was to be controlled remotely, including cars. Thirteen years into the 21st century, the car that can be driven remotely is still a figment of the imagination, but that doesn't mean we can't still do some cool stuff with our cars from far away. 
"We can't yet drive our cars by remote control, but we can track their location, unlock their doors, start their engine or even fire up their air conditioning system from miles away," Brauer said.
"GM is one of several manufacturers to offer such features through its OnStar communication and security system. These same systems let also the vehicles talk back to their owners, sending service and maintenance information through text or email messages."

Smart cruise control


For a motorist driving across an uninterrupted expanse of highway, cruise control has always been a godsend. However, motorists can now benefit from this technology, and they don't need to be driving across Texas to do it. Yes, smart cruise control has arrived, and it can help drivers in a variety of contexts.
"Today's smart cruise control systems, such as Lexus' Adaptive Cruise Control, use a combination of sensors and lasers to track the velocity and location of surrounding traffic," Brauer said. "These systems then match the speed of surrounding vehicles while maintaining a safe following distance via accelerator and brake control, making smart cruise control a true 'set it and forget it' feature."

Self-parking


Cars that drive themselves may not exist yet, but cars that give drivers a helping hand while parking are another story. "Self-driving cars are still a ways out, but several self-parking cars have already arrived," Brauer said.
"Many are luxury vehicles, like the Mercedes-Benz GL or BMW 7 Series, but Ford's $25,000 Focus Titanium also includes the company's Active Park Assist system, which will do the steering for you when you parallel park," he explained. "You still have to control the gas and brake pedal."

Traffic avoidance


In-car navigation has existed for too long to still be defined as cutting-edge technology. However, a car that detects heavy traffic and warns a motorist to stay away from it is a welcome advancement. 
"The next evolution in navigational guidance comes from driving a car that knows the surrounding traffic conditions and takes them into account when picking the most effective route from point A to point B," Brauer said. "Acura's Real-Time Traffic system monitors all nearby roadways and can suggest alternative routes if the traffic patterns change during your trip."

Vocal texting


Every day, more than nine people are killed and more than 1,060 people injured in car crashes involving distracted drivers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
The CDC listed three main types of distraction for drivers—taking their eyes off the road, their hands off the wheel and their minds off of driving. Texting while driving combines all three of these distractions, making it an especially dangerous activity for motorists.
"For most drivers the only smart option—and in many states, the legally required one—is to put the phone down and ignore texts until you reach your destination," Brauer said. "But Nissan offers a technology through its NissanConnect system that will read incoming text messages and reply with simple text responses using voice control—no typing required."

In-car Wi-Fi


Americans want to be online for as long as possible, wherever possible, with the best connection possible. Unfortunately, this isn't always an option within the confines of a car. Luckily, several automakers have figured out that if you build a rolling Wi-Fi hotspot, motorists will come.
"Chrysler, Dodge and Jeep all offer a system called Uconnect Access that will let you stay online while on the road," Brauer said. "Audi has gone a step further by being the first automaker to offer 4G LTE connection speeds in its upcoming A3 sedan."

The Car Chasers


Jeff Allen and Perry Barndt are gamblers—their game being classic and exotic cars. They travel the country looking to buy and sell them. Whether it's a rare Shelby Mustang or a vintage hot rod, the key is buy low and sell high, something that doesn't always happen.
Selling cars is a dangerous business, but perhaps there's no greater risk than negotiating with your own father. Tom Souter, Jeff's dad, runs a classic car dealership around the corner from Jeff's shop in Lubbock, Texas. They are not just regular trading partners; they are trading partners hell-bent on one-upmanship. Tom said doing a deal with his son is like being locked in a closet with a porcupine: "It's gonna hurt, but you know it won't kill you."
Tune in to the new season of "The Car Chasers" on CNBC Prime, all new episodes Tuesdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.




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